Monoculture: How One Story Is Changing Everything

One of the interesting books that I’ve read for my Annotated Bibliography assignment is this book titled “Monoculture: How One Story is Changing Everything” by F. S Michaels. He explained how monoculture is shaping our lives in 6 different key areas; our work, our relationships with others and the natural world, our education, our physical and mental health, our communities, and our creativity.

The governing pattern a culture obeys is a master story– one narrative in society that takes over the others, shrinking diversity and forming a monoculture. When you’re inside a master story at a particular time in history, you tend to accept its definition of reality. You unconsciously believe and act on certain things, and disbelieve and fail to act on other things. That’s the power of the monoculture; it’s able to direct us without us knowing too much about it.

A monoculture doesn’t mean that everyone believes exactly the same thing or acts in exactly the same way, but that we end up sharing key beliefs and assumptions that direct our lives. Because a monoculture is mostly left unarticulated until it has been displaced years later, we learn its boundaries by trial and error. We somehow come to know how the master story goes, though no one tells us exactly what the story is or what its rules are. We develop a strong sense of what’s expected of us at work, in our families and communities — even if we sometimes choose not to meet those expectations. We usually don’t ask ourselves where those expectations came from in the first place. They just exist — or they do until we find ourselves wishing things were different somehow, though we can’t say exactly what we would change, or how.

Michaels offers a smart and realistic guide to first recognizing the monoculture and the challenges of transcending its limitations, then considering ways in which we, as sentient and autonomous individuals, can move past its confines to live a more authentic life within a broader spectrum of human values.

References:

http://www.brainpickings.org/2011/09/02/monoculture-michaels/

Available at:

https://books.google.com.my/books?id=m1SgyHegkSYC&printsec=frontcover&dq=monoculture&hl=en&sa=X&ei=RwimVO7XDpGWuATZpAI&redir_esc=y#v=onepage&q=monoculture&f=false

(assessed on 30th December 2014)

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